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Tomato, spinach, panir casserole

Recipe from Change of Heart by Kay Baxter and Bob Corker

Tomato Ponsonby RedYou can substitute any of the summer greens for spinach in this quick and easy dish.

8 heritage tomatoes – quartered and cored

2 cups cooked spinach

1 cup panir 1cm cubed* see recipe below

1 Tbsp lard, coconut or olive oil

sea salt and cracked pepper to taste

1 cup posole (ground) or breadcrumbs* see below

1/2 cup grated butter

Place tomatoes, spinach, panir, seasoning and oil into a bowl and mix well.Place into a baking dish and cover either with breadcrumbs or ground posole, mix well with the grated butter. Bake at 180degC for about 30 minutes or until brown on top.

*Posole – which you can buy in some supermarkets as Masa flour

Pasole is a traditional way of eating corn where the dried corn is processed with either wood or shell as to increase its nutritional value (up to 60 times more available calcium hydroxide. It’s best made in large batches as it is quite a process. If you have experience of making posole, please get in touch [email protected]
To begin soak six cups of dried corn overnight in water. Pour off the water and put in a pot with 2 cups of bone/shell ash-water, and cover with extra water. Make sure the corn remains covered throughout the cooking process. Simmer for one hour or longer, until the skin can be rubbed off the kernels.
Remove from heat and drain. Place in a colander and rub under running water until you have removed as many of the skins as possible. Then put everything into a bowl or bucket and float off the skins.
Return to the pot and cover with water. Continue cooking for another hour and repeat the whole de-skinning process until the corn kernels are white, fluffy and skinless. They are now ready to be ground for tortillas, added to soup, or dried.

*Panir

3 litres milk

1/4 cup lemon juice or vinegar

1 colander

1 cloth (30x30cm)

Bring your milk to the boil. Slowly add just enough apple cider vinegar or lemon juice to curdle the milk. (I prefer the taste of lemon juice in panir, but either is good).
Next turn heat off and gently stir as little as possible with a wooden spoon until you have a clear yellow why and a mass of panir. If you do not have clear yellow why, add a little more vinegar or lemon juice. Leave the curds in a solid mass, do not break up by stirring.
When you are happy your curds and whey have separated as much as possible, put a cloth inside a colander in the kitchen sink and ladle in the curds. Hang your curd-filled cloth up on the kitchen hook and leave to drain. this will happen very fast and not a lot of whey will come out.
Leave the curds to cool, than remove from cloth and use or freeze for later.
I usually cube the panir and to add to soups or fry and add to veggie dishes.
Because the whey has been boiled and will not contain the life raw whey contains, (although it still has many nutrients), I prefer to feed it to the animals rather than use it in the kitchen, but it can add excellent flavour to soups and stews in place of stock.

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Peach crumble

Taken from Change of Heart – The Ecology of Nourishing Food by Kay Baxter and Bob Corker

River-Peaches-31.1.07-034

Serves four

Slice eight ripe peaches and arrange carefully into the bottom of a 20cm pie dish. Sprinkle with 1/4 a cup of rapadura sugar or honey, followed by the crumble mix.

To make the crumble you need:

1/2 a cup of butter (grated)

1/2 a cup of rapadura* or honey

1 cup posole* or sprouted, dried grain wheat*, or wheat flour

If using posole or sprouted wheat, grind it in a corn grinder first, then place in a bowl with grated butter and rapadura/honey. Mix thoroughly with fingers and sprinkle over peaches. Place in a moderate oven and bake until golden brown on top. Serve with kefir cream or ordinary cream.

*Rapadura sugar is made from the juice extracted from the sugar cane which is then evaporated over a low heat and ground to produce a grainy dark rich sugar. It is free of chemicals.

*Sprouted dried wheat grain: Place wheat in a glass sprouting jar. Soak for 12 hours, then drain, rinse and leave covered to sprout for 12 hours.
Rinse, drain and cover again. Repeat that process until the small white rootlets first appear. Dry these sprouts in a solar dryer, dehydrator, or very low temperature oven.
The grain is then ready to grind as per normal. It has a sweet and nutty taste. We have organic heritage seeds for wheat and nine other grains available.

Posole – which you can buy in some supermarkets as Masa flour

IMG_5744

Posole is a traditional way of eating corn where the dried corn is processed with either wood or shell as to increase its nutritional value (up to 60 times more available calcium hydroxide. It’s best made in large batches as it is quite a process. If you have experience of making posole, please get in touch [email protected]
To begin soak six cups of dried corn overnight in water. Pour off the water and put in a pot with 2 cups of bone/shell ash-water, and cover with extra water. Make sure the corn remains covered throughout the cooking process. Simmer for one hour or longer, until the skin can be rubbed off the kernels.
Remove from heat and drain. Place in a colander and rub under running water until you have removed as many of the skins as possible. Then put everything into a bowl or bucket and float off the skins.
Return to the pot and cover with water. Continue cooking for another hour and repeat the whole de-skinning process until the corn kernels are white, fluffy and skinless. They are now ready to be ground for tortillas, added to soup, or dried. To grow your own corn check out our 17 different organic heritage seed varieties.

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Sauerkraut

Recipe from Change of Heart by Kay Baxter and Bob Corker

sauerkraut with outside leaves of cabbage

You can make any amount of sauerkraut at one time, however, you need to think about where you will store it.  In the Summer it will continue to ferment, being inedible after a few weeks if you don’t have a cool place to store it.  I prefer to make a large amount at a time in late Autumn, when I know it will keep for the whole Winter without getting too strong.  For making my sauerkraut, I use a pounder that Bob made for me out of a piece of Ti tree.  The bottom needs to be as wide and flat as possible, and you need to smooth the top so that you can hold it comfortably in your hand whilst pounding.

1 bucket (polypail, 20 litre)

1 pounder

about 10 cabbages

1 large sharp knife or a sauerkraut cabbage cutter

1 sterilized heavy stone

1 dsp sea salt for every large cabbage

1/2 cup whey

1 tsp caraway seeds for every large cabbage

  • Cut the cabbages in half, remove the hard stem (put into your broth pot) and slice the leaves as finely as you possibly can.
  • Once you have sliced the leaves of one whole cabbage, put it into the bucket and pound until the cells begin to break and let out their juice.  Continue slicing the cabbage and adding to the bucket with a little salt and caraway seeds between each cabbage, pounding until you feel the juice coming out of the cabbage.
  • Once  you have the bucket as full as you’re going to make it, tip in your whey and give the barrel a good mix.  Then place a plate upside down inside the bucket, on top of the cabbage, with as little room as possible between the bucket and the plate.  On top of that, put as heavy a stone as you can find, and then put the lid on (it will work with a cloth on top as well, as long as the juice comes over the plate within 48 hours).
  • Once you can see the juice is covering the plate and the cabbage fermenting, you can find a cool place and leave it there for around 3 weeks.
  • When the strong fermentation process has finished and the sauerkraut tastes good, you can pack it into glass jars and put in the fridge.  I usually leave it in the bucket in our coolsafe.

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Moroccan Lamb Tagine

Taken from Change of Heart – The Ecology of Nourishing Food by Kay Baxter and Bob Corker

Moroccan Lamb Tagine

Tagines are the Moroccan way of slow cooking seasonal mixes of meat (often the cheaper fatty cuts which are the ones we enjoy the best!), vegetables, fruit and spices in their traditional earthenware baking dishes that keep moisture in.  If you have an earth pizza oven, you can make these wonderful, rich, full of flavour dishes in the authentic way.  In Winter and Spring you might have to add dried fruit instead of fresh fruit, however in Summer and Autumn there will be loads of fresh fruit.  Some of those commonly use are apricots, apples, quinces, pears and even peaches.  The dried fruit could be prunes, raisins, sultanas, apricots and dates.  They always include lemons and olives.  These dishes are great the next day as well, so make more than you need and cook two meals in one!  You can use pork or chicken as well (p.185)

IMG_9986

9 Tbsp Moroccan spice mix (p. 263)

piece of organic lamb for 6 people

2 large heritage Pukekohe Long Keeper onions, chopped fine

4 Tbsp olive oil

3 cloves garlic

2 cups tomato puree or juice (p. 236)

1 litre bottled roasted tomato puree (p. 237)

1 cup dried apricots, cut in half (or other dried or fresh fruit like apples, quinces, pears)

1 litre lamb, beef or chicken stock

1 Tbsp honey

2 Tbsp cilantro

2 Tbsp Dalmatian Parsley, roughly chopped

  • Place lamb in a bowl with half the spice mix, cover and leave overnight in cool place or fridge.
  • Preheat oven to 150 degrees Celcius.  Heat 1 Tbsp olive oil in a large casserole dish, add the onion and remaining spice mix, and cook over gentle heat for 10 minutes, so onions are soft but not brown.  Add crushed garlic for final 3 minutes.
  • In separate frying pan, heat remaining oil and brown sides of lamb, then add browned meat to casserole dish.  Pour 1/2 cup tomato juice to the frying pan and warm whilst mixing the juice with their juices and flavours in the pan.  Add to the casserole dish.
  • Add remaining ingredients to casserole dish and bring to the boil.  Cover with a fitted lid and place in the oven to cook for 2-2 1/2 hours or until very tender  Sprinkle with chopped herbs when serving.
  • If you have room in your dish, you can cook potatoes with the meat, or kumara or pumpkin (just add for the final hour)
  • Separately baked Maori potatoes are great with this dish, as are mashed potatoes (p.115), mashed kumara (p.115), quinoa, rice etc.

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